I am confused about the keywords in the spreadsheet. For example, there is a keyword “oxford shoes for kids” that shows really low competition in the spreadsheet, but obviously there are many seller in there. So it would appear the data returned by junglescout is incorrect. Searching the same keyword on the web app returned same data as the spreadsheet, so it’s not a spreadsheet problem. Any explanation for this?

Earn residual income through referring consumers to an established product or service. Use your site to advertise to the company or companies you are interested in providing referrals for. Referral efforts can be coupled with informative e-books, seminars, or articles about the product or service. Build your newsletter lists in the same manner, the difference being that you are directing consumers to a third-party business.


One of the best ways I ever saw total market share explained was by thinking of it like a giant pie and there’s only ever that much pie to go around. When you look at the JS data, you aren’t seeing a reflection of what you’ll get. For example, if there’s three sellers selling 300 units per month, if you join in, you’re not going to get 300 per month… you’re going to get 225 because your presence in the market has just reduced current demand by 25% for each of the current competitors. In the end, demand is only 900 units per month, regardless of how much supply there is. And in actuality, you’re more likely to do less than that as you might only take away 5% away from current competitors, earning yourself 45 sales per month.
Not only does learning digital marketing and getting your digital marketing training certification put you ahead of the competition when it comes to landing a role in general, but it can also lead to an increase in salary. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American salary is $44,564 annually. According to Glassdoor, however, the average American digital marketer makes $71,127 annually. This is just the average base pay and does not include annual bonuses or other perks.
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Obviously with such a hugely valuable niche where people will be spending on average around $30,000 to $60,000 on a boat, there will be tons of information and reviews available, right?  Wrong!  In fact, MOST of the boats that I was interested in had zero reviews to be found anywhere on the internet.  Zero.  And all the manufacturers showed was a few pictures, sometimes a sales video, and an abbreviated spec sheet.  That’s it.  I scoured the internet for unbiased reviews of boats and did not find anything helpful at all.
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