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Frankly, I do not care whether there is a site on the same topic as one I’m building.  My most profitable website is a photography website.  Not any specific niche of photography.  Just photography in general.  Guess what?  I wasn’t the first photography site.  There are hundreds of thousands of sites about photography!  It really doesn’t matter.  Even if someone else has a “better” site than mine, some people will identify with me, like the way I write better than other sites, will find my site first, etc.  You don’t have to be the only one in a niche to make a site work.  Not at all!  In fact, I have had more success building sites in busy niches than in empty ones.  The fact that people are there means there are potential customers and visitors there.
Oops, my last sentence should have been “in addition to buying your services and courses” not “except”, it was already after 12 at night here yesterday. Yes, checking niches obsessively is something I can relate too as well. I think I got about some hundred domains I bought after researching new topics but then never found the time to build content for them and really make use of them. After renewing them for two or three years in a row I decided to focus on related niches I can build like more related content for and then also throwing in some useful links in between them. 🙂
There are dozens of ways to generate passive income. However, the option you select has to do with two metrics: time and money. Either you have a lot of time or a lot of money. Most people usually don't have both. But, if you have a lot of money, generating passive income almost instantly is easy. You can buy up some real estate and begin enjoying rental income. Or, you can invest in a dividend fund or some other investment vehicle that will begin generating a steady income for you.
I know this from experience. Three years ago I was a struggling affiliate marketer, bouncing from offer to offer (playing a game of what I call “affiliate pinball”). Today I make a full-time income from diverse passive income streams: sales of affiliate products, sales of my own products, and Adsense revenue (my Adsense revenue alone topped $2,000 last month). And it’s all because I focus on serving the needs of a niche audience.

Determine who your main online competitors are. Research how they work, how they market and how big of a market share you believe they have. Sign up for e-newsletters, research their press releases and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each online competitor. You may even need to purchase something from them in order to understand how they complete their sales process.
1. The batting cage idea is very risky. I’ve seen many of them close over the years and it is not anything close to passive income if you want to keep the business going. You have to continually promote it and target youth leagues, coaches, schools etc to catch all of the new players who grow up and want to play. I’ve played at probably 8 batting cages over the years and 7 of them closed.
Every aspect of the site appears professional, including the presence of a demo, a free trial and multiple ways to contact the company. There are three plans to choose from. Pro supports 200 attendees for $119 per month. Elite allows up to 500 attendees and costs $199 per month. Finally, Summit allows 1,000 attendees and costs $399 per month. Each plan is discounted if customers pay annually, rather than month-to-month.
Teachable and Udemy are two of many, but these are the most prevalent, and they’re both intuitive and user-friendly. With Teachable, you have more control over your pricing and the look and feel of your course, but you don’t get a built-in audience. Instead you have to do all the marketing yourself. Udemy has a built-in base of students, but you don’t have as much control and they take more of your revenue.
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